Tag Archives: romanruins

The Lycian Way – Part Three

Whilst we were walking the Lycian Way we couldn’t help but compare it to our experience on the Camino de Santiago. The two walks couldn’t be more different despite the fact that they are both cross country expeditions through small (and larger) towns.

The Lycian way seemed to be easier on your feet because the terrain is much more varied, with lots of walking done on softer ground than the Camino. However our joints seemed to be suffering more under the weight of our packs and ibuprofen has been vital for reducing my ever-swelling knees and ankles.

20140423-192847.jpg

Also, the distances covered aren’t really something that anyone takes any notice of. On the Camino it was all about how many kilometres you would walk in a day. On this walk it seems to be in hours and minutes. Sometimes the smallest distance can take you the longest because of the terrain you are walking on.

Then there is the accommodation. Whilst you can camp on the Camino, not many people do as the albergue accommodation is so well set-up for the walk. On the Lycian Way, we have been camping the majority of the time so we don’t have to worry about making it to the next town. In fact, the better campsites are usually 1 or 2 kms outside of the town.

Day 5

Xanthos to Delikkemer

We woke up feeling rejuvenated and ready to begin hiking again. We planned to camp just outside of the town Akbel so we needed an early start. We left by 8:15AM and made good pace in the morning. This stretch of the walk was particularly interesting as we spent most of it following the aqueduct that used to supply the Lycian civilisation with water. Amazing to think that we were walking along a structure that is almost 2000 years old.

20140423-193036.jpg

20140423-193100.jpg

We arrived at a place called Impinar spring where part of the aqueduct is still in use. It was there that we met a new friend, Jegor from Estonia, and it was also there that we lost the way markers.

20140423-193349.jpg

The three of us wandered around a bit lost for a while until we finally found the white and red stripes that show us the way forward.

20140423-193358.jpg

We walked almost 10 hours again that day but it didn’t feel as long with Jegor there to chat with. We made it to the Delikkemer aqueduct ruins at 7PM and made camp.

20140423-193609.jpg

20140423-193601.jpg

Adam and I were impressed with Jegor’s one-man set up and the boys discussed cooking equipment while I made the fire. It was so good to have found another amazing campsite with a beautiful view of the green rocky hills that lead down to the Mediterranean Sea.

Day 6

Delikkemer to Patara and a taxi to Kalkan

Adam and I spent four hours the next morning walking with Jegor to Patara ruins and beach.

20140423-193803.jpg

The ruins were impressive and a nice place to rest after our brisk morning hike.

20140423-201013.jpg

After we’d finished exploring the 2000 year old Lycian capital city and beach, we parted ways with Jegor and caught a taxi up to to the small coastal town of Kalkan, where we were planning to start the next leg of our walk.

20140423-193813.jpg

Kalkan was a great stop. The pension was a welcomed change from the tent and the breakfast and views from the terrace were amazing.

20140423-201140.jpg

We washed our clothes finally and bought supplies for two more solid days of hiking.

Day 7

Kalkan to (2km before) Gokceoren

This was a long, tough day. We walked another 9 hours and most of it was mountainous.

20140423-194249.jpg

We knew we wanted to make it to Kas the next day so it was imperative that we make it as far as we could. The walk was beautiful but isolated.

20140423-194304.jpg

We thought we would be able to buy food for the next day on the way but we passed through two towns that seemed to be empty with no shops.

20140423-194443.jpg

We walked until we couldn’t walk any further and made camp next to an old ruined farm house.

20140423-194605.jpg

The place was beautiful and there was a lot of old dry wood for a fire.

20140423-194620.jpg

At first we had found it a little bit daunting camping in the wild, on someone’s property for all we knew but it was beginning to feel more comfortable. The noises we would hear in the dark didn’t bother us as much and we began to appreciate the ‘silence’ of nature.

20140423-194704.jpg

Day 8

(2km before) Gokceoren to Kas

Our 8th day broke me, I am sorry to say. It was another crazy-long walk with relentlessly steep climbs up slippery mountains and a hot sun bearing down upon us.

20140423-195006.jpg

It had rained on us during the night, but miraculously we both slept well regardless and the tent didn’t fail us. We broke camp very early and realised that we didn’t have anything substantial for breakfast. We hadn’t been able to buy bread the day before – a major issue if we were to last the 9 hours it would take us to walk to Kas. Luckily we had some dried cranberries and hazelnuts to snack on but our stomachs were growling after 20mins of walking.

20140423-195022.jpg

When we reached the small town of Gokceoren our relief was massive when a little old Turkish lady ran out of her house and offered us breakfast (for a price, of course). We gratefully accepted and sat down to the most amazing feast of omelet, bread, homemade cheese & strawberry jam, tomatoes, cucumber, olives and honey from the family beehives.

20140423-195311.jpg

We ate as much as we could, filled up our water bottles and began our long walk to Kas.

20140423-195423.jpg

20140423-195435.jpg

A highlight of the day was the unexpected ruins of Phellos that sits perched up on a high mountain ridge above the small town of Cukurbag.

20140423-195550.jpg

We couldn’t believe that an ancient city once sat on this long forgotten mountain.

20140423-195819.jpg

We took a much needed break there and worked ourselves up to begin the last three hours of our journey for the day.

20140423-195541.jpg

The last three hours to Kas were hard but the views over the small seaside town were incredible.

20140423-200001.jpg

20140423-200022.jpg

Getting down to Kas involved slowly descending a very steep cliff along narrow hairpins. Rocks covered the precarious path and Adam and I slipped over a couple of times each. My right ankle wasn’t dealing with the jolts and slides well and I was in tears by the time we reached the bottom.

20140423-200131.jpg

We decided to stay in Kas for a couple of days to rest my ankle (which seemed to be swelling a lot) and do a bit of touristy sightseeing before we began the next stage of the hike.

We found a gorgeous campground about ten mins outside of town where we pitched our tent and enjoyed the sun and the clear blue sea every day.

20140425-092605.jpg

20140425-092617.jpg

20140425-092639.jpg

But unfortunately my ankle continued to swell and was quite painful to walk on despite four days of rest.

After much debate, we made the decision finally to leave the next section of the walk for another time in the future.

On the bright side, we got to spend eight days on this amazing hike and we would absolutely recommend hiking the Lycian Way. It was a fantastic way to get to know Turkey and its wonderful people.

Advertisements

The Lycian Way – Part Two

Day 3

Gey to (2km before) Letoon

Our third day on the Lycian way was our most challenging so far. We didn’t make ourselves a coffee due to the fact that we only had one litre of water left between us and we weren’t sure if the spring marked on the map would be full or even exist. We also knew that it was going to be a difficult day of walking so we would need to stay as hydrated as we could.

20140420-215858.jpg

We couldn’t help taking a few last snaps of the view from our amazing campsite before heading down the trail.

20140420-220006.jpg

The beginning of our walk was actually quite scary. From our campsite we had to make our way across a valley pass along a very narrow goat track on the face of a large and sheer cliff. My heart was racing quite a few times as the rocks under my feet slid down the cliff towards the sea. It wouldn’t have been quite as difficult if we didn’t have our large, heavy packs on but after a long hour and a distance of only 1km, we made it onto a more solid and wider path.

Right on cue, a spring popped up, exactly where it was marked on the map. It was a full well and we were excited to sit down and make a coffee and brush our teeth with the precious water.

20140420-220515.jpg

Some of the springs on the walk are flowing and it’s easy to fill up. Others you need a contraption to get the water out. Adam has a lot of fun doing this.

20140420-220609.jpg

We walked almost 10 hours again that day, the terrain was varied and we passed a couple of small towns and greenhouses full of ripening tomatoes.

20140420-221201.jpg

The weather was hot and humid and we tried to rest in shade when we could.

20140420-222202.jpg

We were absolutely exhausted when we decided to set up camp a kilometre or two away from the small town of Letoon. We had just passed through kilometres of swampland that was obviously used to dump rubbish and hunt pigs. Adam saw loads of shotgun shells on the ground and there were four-wheel drive tracks everywhere. We had read blogs that described the wild pigs that come sniffing around campsites late at night so we pushed on even though the sun was setting fast.

Eventually we came to a sheltered area with clay ground that had a bit of grass on it to put the tent and only a few sheep chewing noisily on the surrounding bushes. We quickly set up our camp before the darkness set in. I slept horribly that night. I kept waking up to the sound of barking dogs and loud engines in the distance. Adam assured me that we were safe but at about 4AM it started to rain and then storm. As this was only our 3rd night ever in the tent we became slightly concerned about how it would hold up and whether the clay ground we were sleeping on was actually part of the wetlands. We brought our bags into the tent which made the already small area to lie in even smaller. Needless to say, neither of us slept much at all that night.

Day 4

(2km before) Letoon to Xanthos

We packed up everything into our bags whilst we were inside our tent quite efficiently and braved the downpour as we pulled down our tent. We packed it into its sack and carried it between us. We made it to Letoon an hour later and stopped for shelter at a little shop selling bread and other necessities.

We must have looked pretty sore and sorry for ourselves as we walked through on the road between Letoon and Kumluova and finally Xanthos (Kinik). The rain had stopped by this stage and we had made the decision to find a room to stay in Xanthos even though we had only walked 7/8km that morning.

Luckily for us there was lots to do in the small town, other than catch up on sleep. The weekly markets were on in the Main Street. There were stalls selling everything you could want and everyone was so friendly, saying hello and welcome as we passed. We sampled some prunes and apricots but ended up buying a huge bag of dried cranberries to carry on our walk and indulged in a cinnamon flavoured slushy – this was amazing!

In a few hours, the weather had cleared. We took out tent out to the famous Xanthos ruins and set it up to dry while we explored what was left of the 2000 year old city. Amazing that Turkey has some pretty impressive Roman ruins.

20140420-221539.jpg

20140420-221633.jpg

20140420-221553.jpg

20140420-221725.jpg

That night we ate a mountain of delicious Turkish food and slept like the dead. The next day was going to be another long one.